The main reason most people visit Kutch is to see the White Rann or Great Rann.  It is a salt marsh that is flooded during monsoon, and then reappears as the dry of winter sets in.  Located in North West Gujarat, the Great Rann spills into Pakistan, so there is plenty of border security to get through on your way there, and of course a visit from Amitabh Bachchan too.

Amitabh Bachchan Welcomes You

Looking onto the Great Rann, you can see nothing but white as far as the eye can see.

The White Rann of Kutch

It is quite deceptive.  Whilst monsoon was long gone and the salt on top crackled as we walked, underneath was still quite damp.  So when I kicked off my shoes, it is no surprise that my feet started to sink into the mud!

SInking

The feeling of the hard salt and the soft mud was actually quite interesting and no doubt better than any salt scrub pedicure I had had before.

What was really sad was to see the neglect and disregard that so many people had for such a spectacular natural wonder.  Apparently everywhere in the world is a dumping ground for many Indians.

Rubbish left at the White Rann

Seeing the White Rann up close is a must, but for me the best experience was heading up to the highest vantage point in Kutch, Kalo Dungar (Black Hill) and watching the sunset over the blinding white plains as the eagles soared around.  The colours and changes around us were just sublime.

Sunset at Kalo DungarSunset at Kalo DungarSunset at Kalo DungarSunset at Kalo DungarOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

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10 thoughts on “The Great White Rann of Kutch

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  • January 18, 2013 at 1:50 pm
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    Amazing vistas and that sunset picture is really gorgeous! It reminds me rather of the desert I had seen in Oman. It is a pity that many stupid Indians don’t realize the value of these pristine places and continue to dirty them with their garbage. I have time and again ranted about it, but continue to be heartbroken about the Indian littering ability everywhere I go.

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    • January 18, 2013 at 1:55 pm
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      I agree, I get really upset when I see it. It is like they believe it is not their responsibility to help maintain these places.

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  • January 15, 2013 at 10:56 am
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    It’s a little like the salt lakes that are found in the more remote areas of South Australia, some of them many kilometres wide and long. They are spectacular from the air and yes, the sunsets are beautiful also. North of Adelaide near the township of Locheil, there is a pale pink salt lake, thanks I believe to an algae. Some wag installed a rubber tyre sculpture of the Loch Ness Monster (you’d have to see it) some 50 years ago and it is still a local landmark. Lake Eyre is drying up again, so that will revert to its salt lake status soon also.

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    • January 15, 2013 at 12:57 pm
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      I always wanted to see Lake Eyre but haven’t made it there yet. It is definitely going back on the list.

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  • January 8, 2013 at 6:35 pm
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    Beautiful pictures – I enjoy the different things your blog brings me. I’ve never beer to India, but plan to go someday soon.

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  • January 8, 2013 at 1:36 pm
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    Interesting to know about Great Rann of Kutch, Gujarat. I will visit in next trip. Did you see any local cloth work (bharatkam)?

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  • January 8, 2013 at 12:20 pm
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    The view is stunning. Everywhere you turn, you see white ground. Glittering white. Dull white. Salty white. (Yes, I tasted.) The White Rann gets its colour from the salt in the water that freezes over during winters. It’s like Salt Lake City, except it’s in India and the only one of its kind. It’s fascinating to see the desert surface turn slightly to slush as night falls and go back to being rock solid during the day. Of course, when you discover that the phenomenon is because the water evaporates in the sun and the moisture starts settling in again when it sets, you feel a little stupid but fascinated still. A lone army camp in the middle of the Rann was hosting a singing party one night, and on the other nights, there were local performers from the village playing for the crowd.

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